Sunday, October 21, 2012

More Analyzing the Data

The blog post Analzying the Data was a very popular one so I thought I would another one with some additional examples. I picked a couple of normal families out of my file.

Case Study #1, 1850 Federal Census, Perry County, MS1
Silas Simmons, age 56, farmer, born in SC
Janet Simmons, age 55, born in SC
Mary Simmons, age 27, born in MS
James Simmons, age 22, farmer, born in MS
John Simmons, age 19, farmer, born in MS
Liza Simmons, age 15, born in MS
Benjamin Simmons, age 13, born in MS
Elizabeth Simmons, age 9, born in MS
Thomas Simmons, age 7, born in MS

We are assuming that Silas and Janet are married and the others listed in the household are their children. We do have to make some assumptions but those assumptions could change as more information comes in. Also, this family lived in a county where there was a complete records loss in 1877 due to a courthouse fire. That is why you will see a lot of "about" dates.

  • Silas and Janet migrated to MS before 1823 [Silas and Janet were born in SC but daughter Mary was born in MS about 1823]
  • Janet was about 29 when oldest daughter Mary was born. There could be older children that are no longer living at home
  • There is a gap of 5 years between Mary and James. There could be another child there.
  • There is a 4 year gap between John and Liza. There could be another child there.
  • There is a 4 year gap between Benjamin and Elizabeth. There could be another child there.
  • Janet was about 49 when Thomas was born so there probably aren't any younger children.
  • Silas and Janet both died after 06 Oct 1850 [when the census was taken]

After further investigation, here is what was found on each of the above points.

  • Silas actually came to the Mississippi Territory with his parents between 04 Jun 1797 and 20 May 1801.2 I "think" I know who Janet's father was but I am still in the process of proving it; therefore, I can't narrow her migration to Mississippi down any further than to say it would have been before 1815 when Silas and Janet married (based on the birth of their oldest known child Elizabeth who was born 13 Sep 1816.3 See the next point to found that newly found oldest child)
  • There were two more children older than Mary; Elizabeth and William4 [both married before 18505]
  • There are actually TWO more children in this 5 year gap. Nancy and Abner6 who both married before 1850.7
  • No child was found that would have been born in this gap.
  • According to the 1840 census there was another daughter that would have been 10 to 15 years old on the 1850 that is missing.8
  • Thomas was the youngest child found. It is possible that Janet did have a younger child but he/she would have died before the 1860 census.
  • Silas died between 19 Feb 18569 [when he appeared in court for his land warrant] and 18 Aug 186010 [His youngest children are now living with their oldest sister Elizabeth and her husband]. Janet died between the two censuses.

If there had been a larger gap in the children's ages and/or an age difference between Silas and Janet you would also be thinking along the lines of another marriage for one or both of them. This particular example did not have this but I wanted to mention it so that you will be looking for that sort of thing. Silas and Janet's case study is a very straight forward one that is pretty easy to work with. The next one is a bit more involved with very little info to go on. This is an active case so I don't know if my theories are correct yet.

Case Study #2, Solomon Patton and Lydia Orr
What we know:

  • Lydia Orr received an orphan's draw in the 1805 Georgia Land Lottery.11 The land received was in Oglethorpe County, Georgia.
  • Lydia Orr married Solomon Patton on 11 Feb 1806 in Wilkes County, Georgia.12
  • The 1830 census shows that Lydia Patton is now head of household.13 It has her as age 40 to under 50. [Unable to find Solomon and Lydia in the 1820 census. There are no earlier censuses for Georgia EXCEPT for 1800 Oglethorpe County]
  • We do find Solomon Patton in the 1800 Oglethorpe County census14. Solomon appears to have been older than Lydia and was married at least once before. The census puts Solomon's date of birth between 1776 and 1794 and he has a female in the same age bracket in his household.
    6 free white males under age 10
    1 free white male age 10 to under 16
    1 free white male age 26 to under 45
    1 free white female age 26 to under 45

Hypotheses

  • Knowing that during this time period most women didn't marry until they were at least 18 that would put Lydia's date of birth before 1789. The 1830 census puts her date of birth between 1781 and 1790 so those two dates correlate. We can narrow it to 1781 and 1788.
  • Her land draw in 1805 was as an orphan so Orr is her maiden name. Her name on her marriage license is Lydia Orr so Solomon was her first marriage. It is possible she remarried after Solomon died. Lydia is enumerated in 1830 as head of household (Solomon is assumed dead) but could have married after the 1830 census was taken. She is not found in the 1840 census under Lydia Orr so she has either died or remarried.
  • She married in Wilkes County but her land draw was the year before in Oglethorpe. It is more likely that her parents died in Oglethorpe County (the two counties are side by side).

1. 1850 U.S. census, Perry County, Mississippi, population schedule, p. 384 [stamped], dwelling 185, family 185, Silas Simmons household; National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll 379.

2. James Simmons, Jr. Family Bible, The Holy Bible (Philadelphia: Kimber and Sharpless, n.d.), “Family Record”; privately held by Homer Kees (Baton Rouge, Louisiana); The Kimber and Sharplesss publishing company was in business 1807 – 1844 [John Wright, Early Bible of America (New York: Thomas Whittaker, 1892), 123.] The earliest entries are in one same hand, the later entries are in a different hand and the latest entries are in a third hand. Per Mr. Kees, the Bible passed from James to his youngest child Charity Green Simmons who was Mr. Kees’ grandmother. He inherited the Bible from her. James Simmons, Jr. was Silas' younger brother. His date of birth of 04 Jun 1797 [in SC] is recorded as well as the date of death of their mother, 20 May 1801 [in MS].

3. Simmons and Simmons, The Family Simmons Living in Perry and Forrest County, Mississippi on Leaf River and Black Creek, Early 1800s Thru 1995,6; Howard Simmons had interviewed George Simmons, grandson of Silas Simmons, several times between 1937 and 1946. Howard states that George was in possession of Silas Simmons’ family Bible and he copied information out of it. However, Howard failed to record the publication information. Howard Simmons is now deceased and the location of the Bible is not known.

4. Ibid.

5. 1850 U.S. census, Perry County, Mississippi, population schedule, p. 387 [stamped], dwelling 264, family 264, Henry Dearman household; National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll 379; 1850 U.S. census, Perry County, Mississippi, population schedule, p. 384 [stamped], dwelling 184, family 184, William Simmons household; National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll 379.

6. Simmons and Simmons, The Family Simmons Living in Perry and Forrest County, Mississippi on Leaf River and Black Creek, Early 1800s Thru 1995,6

7. 1850 U.S. census, Perry County, Mississippi, population schedule, p. 387 [stamped], dwelling 260, family 260, John Guluspie household; National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll 379; 1850 U.S. census, Perry County, Mississippi, population schedule, p. 384 [stamped], dwelling 184, family 184, Abner Simmons household; National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll 379.

8. 1840 U.S. census, Perry County, Mississippi, p. 180 [stamped], line 5, Silas Simmons household; National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M704, roll 217.

9. Silas Simmons War of 1812 bounty land warrant file 64098 (Act of 1850), RG 15, National Archives, Washington, D.C.

10. 1860 U.S. census, Perry County, Mississippi, population schedule, Southern District, p. 19 [penned], dwelling 127, family 117, Henry Dearman household; National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M653, roll 589.

11. Georgia Surveyor General, “Land Lottery Grants, District 5 1805-1806,” loose certificates, alphabetically arranged, Lyddia Orr, Baldwin County, Georgia; FHL microfilm 511958; The land grant was in Oglethorpe County but filed in Baldwin.

12. Wilkes County, Georgia, Marriage Book 1806-1834: 15, Solomon Patton-Lydia Orr, 1806.

13. 1830 U.S. census, Wilkes County, Georgia, Militia District 167, p. 320 [penned], line 11, Lydia Pattern household; National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M29, roll 21.

14. Jeanne Arguelles, "1800 Federal Census, Oglethorpe County, Georgia," transcription, USGenWeb Archives (http://ungwarchives.net), Solomon Patton household; Captain Mathew's District.

P.S. This will probably be the last time you see linked footnotes on this blog. They are a major pain to format so from now on it will be simple footnotes. You will have to do your own scrolling back and forth. Also, if you have a family you would like me to use as an example for analyzing the data just send me what you know.


Copyright © 2012 Michele Simmons Lewis

No comments:

Post a Comment