Monday, February 25, 2013

Two Cool Photos

This would be my 2nd great-grandparents Albert Gallitan Graham (1844-1926) and his wife Mary “Mittie” Richardson (Grantham) Graham (1839-1917).  Albert was a Confederate veteran and Mittie was a midwife.  Mittie’s daughter Corrine died in childbirth with my grandfather in 1910.  I always wondered if Mittie was in attendance during that birth.  This picture would have been taken around 1889.

Albert


Here is the same couple only later!  This one would have been taken about 1905.

Albert2

“Everyone” says that Mittie was part Indian.  What do you think?  My DNA shows 5% unknown.  Do you think part of that 5% in Native American and came from Mittie?  So many Indian rumors in the family and so little proof.


Copyright © 2013 Michele Simmons Lewis

17 comments:

  1. Age takes a toll. I don't know about the 5%. I think it's often hard to tell what anybody is by a photograph.

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  2. If, for the sake if argument, Mittie was 100% Indian (which I know for a fact she wasn't) and there was no other Indians in my line whatsoever, that would make me 6.25% I love math :)

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  3. What amazing photographs. You are so lucky to have them in your collection. They speak volumes don't they?

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  4. I have very few photographs because on my mother's side most were destroyed during WWII. On my dad's side they were all dirt poor Mississippi farmers and they just didn't have the money to have a lot of photographs.

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  5. I really enjoy your photographs. I have been blessed with the treasure of 100+ photos of my grandfather's parents families.

    Two things I noticed in your photos. What is the chain or string other dress. Do you think it is holding eyeglasses? On his photo does he have a cloth of some sort across his knees? I can't see his pants legs. I always enjoy your postings!

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  6. I am not sure. My first impression is that it was a watch and chain. The reason I say is that she was a midwife and might have needed to time contractions? I am a nurse and we have watches that pin right to our shirts that are upside down so that you can see the time (and the second hand) without having to touch the watch.

    I appreciate your kind comments, Joan :)

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  7. Michelle, I would believe she was at least half Native American. She is much darker than her husband and women in those days did not like to tan, they liked to stay pale.

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  8. I do believe that she does have some Indian in her but I can't really narrow it down much. Supposedly it was her grandmother, Elizabeth Matilda Irby, that was the Indian but of course I can't prove it. Maybe I need to work on that line again. I haven't revisited it in quite some time.

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    1. Hi, I do believe Elizabeth M. Irby was my great grand mother 8 generations ago. I would love to get more info on her line or anyone closely related to her. I realize this is an old post :( Any help would be much appreaciated !

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    2. The Elizabeth Irby has been a real pain for me. Take a look at this post...

      https://ancestoring.blogspot.com/2017/04/critical-couples.html?m=0

      One of the "critical couples" is Elizabeth's father David Irby. The problem is, I can't figure out who her dad was and people have 3 different distinct parents for her. Whoever David Irby is, I have MANY matches to his line.

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  9. You've probably seen the photo of Mittie's maternal uncle, Hezekiah Slade: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=65244788

    Many of Hez's children also have photos at Find A Grave. His wife Helena Taylor allegedly had native ancestry as well, but Hez's children (those we have portraits of) look whiter than their father. "Everyone" says Helena Taylor's mother was "full-blood Creek," but I'm skeptical.

    I believe the Slades had some native ancestry, at least. As to whether they were part-Cherokee as "everyone" says, your guess is as good as mine.

    Hezekiah Slade is my 4th great-grandfather via his daughter Elizabeth Slade Ladner Rouse.

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  10. Supposedly Hez's mother Elizabeth Matilda Irby was Indian but you know how that goes :) :) :)

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  11. The version I've seen (undocumented, naturally) is that her father was David Irby and her mother was Cherokee, making Elizabeth Matilda half-Cherokee. Someone at Ancestry has her mother's name as "Rebecca White Urey," and another researcher (Ken Slade, via Alfred Clinton St. Andry) reports that her name was the improbably-pretty-sounding "White Star."

    (third-hand report, gleaned from here: http://www.genealogy.coaker.genealogy.com/forum/surnames/topics/slade/272/)

    See also this anecdote from a Mixon descendant (Rebecca Slade, Mittie's aunt, married John Mixon): http://www.mixsonian.com/genealogy/mixon-mixson/pg-237.html

    I have not been able to determine how our folks relate to the Dancing Rabbit Creek document on the next page of the above link. It might be that John Mixon was simply an unrelated "assignee." He may even have been taking advantage of Hoo-bah-tubbe--I hope that's not the case, but things like that happened often enough. Hoo-bah-tubbe might be the "Ho-ba-tubbe" listed among the Choctaw who were issued land scrip under the terms of the treaty. I believe "See-quak-Natch-ah" is "Su-Quah-Natch-Ah," a band of Mississippi Choctaw.

    As we're fifth cousins, once removed, there may be enough shared DNA to see a few shared segments from our shared Slade line (no guarantees; at only five generations out ancestors may begin dropping out of the genome altogether). I'll send you an email.

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    1. Oh the Dancing Rabbit Treaty, I know all about that one. Three of my grandpa's first cousins tried to get included in that in the 1950s. The treaty was being challenged and everyone was trying to their money cut. I have some newspaper clippings and one of the letters that was sent trying to convince the government that they were really Indians. The claim went nowhere and the court case was lost. Did I mention that I have 0% Native American DNA and my uncle who is one generation closer also has 0%?

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  12. This far out, some ancestors have been lost in the autosomal shuffle, so 0% DNA doesn't disprove a Native fourth or fifth great-grandparent (Elizabeth Matilda Irby or her mother). Each individual is dealt a hand from the genetic deck; some cards are left behind with each generation.

    My sister (I haven't tested yet) has around 1-2% Native DNA depending on the admix tool. There are several lines in the tree with alleged Native ancestry...if all the stories are true, and if each alleged ancestor is full-blood, we'd have 8-9%, but I tend to believe it's closer to 2-3%.

    However, Scandinavians and Germans often have false positive NA DNA (for the Germans, it's from invading Huns...for the Scandinavians, it's from the Sami). That's us on Dad's side, so it's hard to tease out what's really there. We have two Slade cousins with very small matching segments of Native DNA, which is encouraging. They are also descendants of Charles Taylor and his unnamed first wife, so it's hard to say whether we match through the Slades or the Taylors.

    But without any documentation, we sift through the DNA and study these old photos!

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    1. Tis true but I supposedly have a whole herd of Indians in my pedigree so I would think something would register.

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  13. Autosomal inheritance, thou art a heartless wench!

    Still...there are a whole lot of markers not yet in the "toolbox" for designing these admixture tests, in part because participation from Native communities has been (understandably) low. In the future, some of us may see higher percentages as these tests improve.

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