Monday, October 31, 2016

The cost of DNA testing

All I have to say is, no matter how much I spend on DNA testing I will still never spend as much as my husband and son do on hunting and fishing.  ‘Nuff said.

 

Copyright © 2016 Michèle Simmons Lewis

Saturday, October 29, 2016

Der Johannisfriedhof ist der schönste Friedhof Deutschlands

Yesterday I told you that the Johannisfriedhof in Bielefeld had been voted the most beautiful cemetery in Germany. I linked to the article but I couldn’t post the photo because I didn’t have permission to use it.  My cousin Christina has come through again.  She gave me two photos to use. 


Photograph copyright © 2016 Christina Gläntzer, used with permission


Photograph copyright © 2016 Christina Gläntzer, used with permission

 

Copyright © 2016 Michèle Simmons Lewis

Friday, October 28, 2016

Dr. Oetker’s wife

Anyone that knows anything about Germany will understand the significance if what I am about to say.  My friend (and distant cousin) Christina and I work together on the Gläntzer/Glaentzer One-Name Study. She told me something today that has nothing whatsoever to do with the Gläntzers but it is the best piece of news.  Christina’s great-grandmother was best friends with Dr. Oetker’s wife!  Yes, THE Dr. Oetker!  For those of you that are sitting there scratching your head right now, Dr. Oetker is the Betty Crocker of Germany. There are hundreds of Dr. Oetker products and Dr. Oetker cookbooks are very popular.  I own five Dr. Oetker cookbooks myself and whenever I go to Helen, Georgia I stock up on Dr. Oetker cooking and baking supplies.  (For those who don’t know, Helen is a town in the north Georgia mountains that is patterned after a German village). 

Christina was kind enough to send me a photograph and give me permission to use it in the blog. 

Fromm, Friedrich and wife AnnaPhotograph circa 1937, Baden-Baden, Germany, courtesy of Christina Gläntzer
Left to right, Mrs. Oetker, Dr. Fritz Fromm and wife Eleonore (Baack) Fromm

Oh but that wasn’t the only thing Christina told me today.  She also let me know that a cemetery where family members are buried was named the most beautiful cemetery in Germany.  “Der Johannisfriedhof ist der schönste Friedhof Deutschlands.” I can’t post the picture of the cemetery because I don’t have permission to use it but if you have Facebook you can see it HERE.

Today is a very good day.

 

Copyright © 2016 Michèle Simmons Lewis

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

DeArmond - Fuller - Crowder Family Cemetery

A man named Daniel happened across a blog post I did on Pumpkin Center, Georgia which is the community where I live.  You can see that original blog post HERE.  He posted a comment which said:

“Good afternoon! I found your information online and saw you did a lot of research on cemeteries and were in the Pumpkin Center, GA area. My mom's side of the family is from Pumpkin Center and I spent every summer at grandma's house, which is at the corner of Wrightsboro Road and Old Appling Harlem Highway. The reason I am writing though, is that I am working on my family lineage and while researching, I remembered finding a few graves in the edge of the woods across the street from grandma's house. I looked online but did not see them mentioned anywhere and wondered who they were. I wondered if you knew of these graves and if you had any information on them? Growing up, my mom and grandma always told me they were in the woods there and I remember finding them one summer. A few summers later, I remember going there again and finding they looked like someone had tried to dig them up, which spooked me as a kid and I never returned. That was probably 25 years ago. I did a parcel search online and that property is indeed listed as a cemetery. It's parcel 030 004B and is a triangle shape bordered by Wrightsboro Road to the north side of the property and Old Appling Harlem Highway on the south side of the property. The graves were on the south side, just inside the tree line if I remember correctly. Have you ever seen these or heard of them?”

I was a bit miffed that there might be a cemetery less than half a mile from my house that I didn’t know about. Needless to say, I dropped everything I was doing.  I had to find this cemetery.

I was able to locate the current land owner via the Columbia County tax records and I gave her a call.  She was very nice and told me yes, there is a cemetery out there.  She hadn’t been out there in years though. She told me that the cemetery is not visible from the roadway and it is in heavy woods.  She gave me some landmarks to look for and off I went.  I had no problem finding it.  There are 11 graves marked with readable markers and several more graves marked only with brick coping and fieldstones.  I searched for the names on Find A Grave and found that they were not there so I added a new cemetery and the markers I found.  And here is the DeArmond – Fuller – Crowder Family Cemetery.  I goofed when I added the cemetery name.  It should be DeArmond and not Dearmond.  I have already sent a request to have it fixed.

IMG_0150
Copyright © 2016 Michele Simmons Lewis

 

Copyright © 2016 Michèle Simmons Lewis

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Buckner Hospital

I am working on a report about my 3rd great-grandfather who died at Buckner Hospital in Gainesville, Alabama after the Battle of Shiloh. I just found a memoir that a nurse who served Buckner Hospital wrote. She detailed the horrible conditions there and stated,

"Alas! alas! were these the brave men who had made forever glorious the name of Shiloh?"

Having a first hand account of what was going on at the hospital at the time is invaluable. Since she was there after the Battle of Shiloh, it is very possible she herself took care of my 3rd great-grandfather.

Mathew Patton is buried at the Confederate Cemetery in Gainesville though his grave is only marked as “unknown.”  There are well over 200 unknown graves here.

imagePhotograph Copyright © 2016, Tammy Underwood McCown, used with permission

 


Fannie A. Beers, Memories: A Record of Personal Experience and Adventure During Four Years of War (Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Company, 1889), 59-69; digital images, Google Books (https://books.google.com : accessed 30 July 2016).

 

Copyright © 2016 Michèle Simmons Lewis

Sunday, October 23, 2016

Where were your parents born? (Part II)

You can read Part I HERE.

I am trying to prove that Janet Simmons’ brother was Cornelius Freeman and that their father was James Freeman.  It would be helpful to know where Cornelius was born.  Cornelius died before the 1850 census was taken.  His widow, Elizabeth, was living in Perry County, Mississippi and her birth place was given as North Carolina.  She lived to the 1860 census and in 1860 she was now born in South Carolina.  Since she has no clue where she was born why should I expect the children to know?  Cornelius and Elizabeth had four children.  Three lived to 1880 and two lived to 1900.

Census

Child

Father’s birthplace

Mother’s birthplace

1880

Francis

South Carolina

Georgia

1900

Francis

Mississippi

Mississippi

1880

Charity

South Carolina

Georgia

1880

David

Georgia

Georgia

1900

David

North Carolina

North Carolina

 
 
*Yes of course I know all about how mistakes can happen in the census.  You never know who the actual informant was, you don’t know if the enumerator was paying attention, and you don’t know who recopied the census pages and how careful they were. If I wasn’t trying to figure out whether or not Janet and Cornelius were siblings this would actually be quite funny.

 

Copyright © 2016 Michèle Simmons Lewis

Saturday, October 22, 2016

Where were your parents born? (rhetorical)

According to the 1850 federal census in Perry County, Mississippi, both Silas Simmons and his wife Janet were born in South Carolina.  Silas and Janet died before the 1860 census was taken.  Eight of their children lived to the 1880 census and then two of those made it to 1900.  So where were Silas and Janet born?

Census Child Father’s birthplace Mother’s birthplace
1880 Elizabeth North Carolina North Carolina
1880 William South Carolina South Carolina
1880 Nancy Alabama Alabama
1900 Nancy Alabama North Carolina
1880 James South Carolina South Carolina
1880 Melinda South Carolina South Carolina
1880 John South Carolina South Carolina
1880 Benjamin South Carolina South Carolina
1880 Matilda Georgia Mississippi
1900 Matilda Mississippi Mississippi


Who knew this was such a hard question.



Copyright © 2016 Michèle Simmons Lewis

Monday, October 10, 2016

More on Maude

For the background information please see A Brick wall for YOU
I haven’t looked at this case in a while and thought it was time to pick it back up.  I am going to try working the DNA angle.  What I am hoping to find is that Maude had more children after she left Lem.  If one of those kids (or grandkids) tested it might lead me to someone that knows something.

Maude only had three grandchildren from her marriage to Lem and all three are living.  One has agreed to DNA testing and I am waiting to hear back from the other two. 
 
I did get an interesting email today from the daughter of one of Maude’s half sisters.  Maude was the oldest child from her dad’s first marriage.  Maude’s half sister from her dad’s second marriage is one of the younger ones in that group so there is actually 31 years difference between the two (there were 9 children from the first marriage and 9 more from the second).  Anyway, the daughter of Maude’s half sister said, "My mother told me that her daddy went so far as to hire a private detective to look for her but they never found her." Ouch. Another blow.  Maude was hiding out well enough that a private detective couldn’t find her. 
 
This is one of those cases that I just can’t let go of.  I really want to know what happened to Maude.
 
Copyright © 2016 Michèle Simmons Lewis