Friday, November 18, 2016

Update on Maude

Here are the two previous posts:
A Brick Wall for YOU
More on Maude

A blog reader suggested that I check to see if Maude applied for a delayed birth certificate in the state of Mississippi. I thought that was a pretty good idea. I requested a search but unfortunately the search was negative and she never filed for one. I really can’t read too much into that though. She would have needed a birth certificate to apply for a social security number but she could have died before she would have applied or she never applied at all which is likely considering that she never (as far as I know) was part of the regular workforce.

Here is a good article on this history of Social Security on the Social Security Administration website:

 Historical Background and Development of Social Security

 

Copyright © 2016 Michèle Simmons Lewis

Saturday, November 12, 2016

Follow up on GySgt Di Reyes Ibañez

What I didn’t tell you yesterday is that Di was a legal immigrant from the Philippines. He made his declaration on 06 October 1959, joined the Marine Corps on 18 Jan 1960 under a green card, took his oath of allegiance on 08 June 1965 and his petition for citizenship was formally granted on 19 June 1964. He died three years later fighting for his new country. Di was single and had no children.   

I did find a passenger list for the USNS David C. Shank that listed Di R. Ibañez along with a Deogracias Ibañez. The vessel traveled from Subic Bay, Philippines to San Francisco, California with a stopover in Agana, Guam. Deogracias was listed as an American citizen while Di was listed as Filipino. This is definitely an avenue of inquiry.

I did a “tree” search on Ancestry and there is one person that has Di in their tree.  I did send a message but that person hasn’t logged in to Ancestry in over a year so I am not too hopeful. I found Di on FamilySearch. He is FSID MBGN-JJ6. There was nothing on him but a birth date with the wrong birth location and a wrong death date. I have updated his listing with what I know so far and as I find out more I will be adding it. I do not want this man forgotten.

FamilySearch has 19 online databases for the Philippines. I couldn’t find Di in any of them. He isn’t listed in the Social Security Death Index so my next move it to try and find his death certificate. I have asked an expert forensic genealogist for instructions on how to get a copy of it. I am hoping his next of kin are listed which I am sure they pulled from his military records. I did find Deogracias Ibañez in the records though. I found a marriage record in the same town where Di was born. Deogracias Ibañez married Natividad Patawaran on 31 December 1955.  Deogracias was a 51 year old widower putting his date of birth about June 1904. Is this Di’s father?  Click HERE to see the marriage contract. There are two other listings for a Deogracias in Manilla with two other spouses but I don’t know yet if this is the same person. I can’t view these two images without going to a FHC.

This is one of those people you just can’t let go of. I still have a lot of research ahead of me.


*Source information can be seen HERE.


Copyright © 2016 Michèle Simmons Lewis

Friday, November 11, 2016

Gunnery Sergeant Di Reyes Ibañez

Ibanez

Every time I pull this bracelet out and look at it I want to cry. Thank you for your service, Gunnery Sergeant Di Reyes Ibañez. I am so sorry you didn’t make it home. Di was missing in action on 05 June 1967. He was declared dead, body not recovered in 1978. You can read his story here:

Gunnery Sergeant Di Reyes Ibañez

 

Copyright © 2016 Michèle Simmons Lewis

Monday, November 7, 2016

Your right to vote

George Washington Esq., President of the United States of AmericaPresident George Washington, courtesy of the Library of Congress

Tomorrow is the big day. This particular election is one of the most controversial in history and it got to me thinking. I wonder who my ancestors voted for. I looked at one ancestor in particular, my #1 brick wall, James Simmons, Sr. I wanted to see which elections he would have voted in and which candidates he would have had to choose from. James was old enough that he would have voted in the very first presidential election. How exciting that must have been for him!  He would have understood just how important his vote was having lived through the American Revolution. Voting was his right, his privilege, and his responsibility. James was 25 years old in 1789 and he would have voted in 14 presidential elections prior to his death in 1843. I assume he did vote. He was of age and a land owner. He also signed a couple legislative petitions making him politically active. Back in those days the only way to learn about the candidates was from the newspaper and from local forums. I have visions of local gatherings discussing/arguing the issues. I wonder if James got up and voiced his opinion. I will probably never know the answer. What I could do is research what each candidate’s platform was and then guess who James voted for based on what I know about him. I think it would be a fun exercise. Here are the presidential elections that James would have voted in.

1789
George Washington (no party affiliation)
John Adams (no party affiliation)

1792
George Washington (Federalist)
John Adams (Federalist)
George Clinton (Anti-Federalist)
Thomas Jefferson (Anti-Federalist)
Aaron Burr (Anti-Federalist)

1796
John Adams (Federalist)
Thomas Jefferson (Democratic-Republican)
Thomas Pinckney (Federalist)
Aaron Burr (Democratic-Republican)

1800
Thomas Jefferson (Democratic-Republican)

Aaron Burr (Democratic-Republican)
John Adams (Federalist)
Charles C. Pinckney (Federalist)
John Jay (Federalist)

1804
Thomas Jefferson (Democratic-Republican)
Charles C. Pinckney (Federalist)

1808
James Madison (Democratic-Republican)
Charles C. Pinckney (Federalist)
George Clinton (Democratic-Republican)

1812
James Madison (Democratic-Republican)
DeWitt Clinton (Federalist)

1816
James Monroe (Democratic-Republican)
Rufus King (Federalist)

1820
James Monroe (Democratic-Republican)

John Quincy Adams (no party affiliation)

1824
John Quincy Adams (no party affiliation)

Andrew Jackson (no party affiliation)
William H. Crawford (no party affiliation)
Henry Clay (no party affiliation)

1828
Andrew Jackson (Democratic)
John Quincy Adams (National Republican)

1832
Andrew Jackson (Democratic)
Henry Clay (National Republican)
John Floyd (no party affiliation)
William Wirt (Antimasonic)

1836
Martin Van Buren (Democratic)
William H. Harrison (Whig)
Hugh L. White (Whig)
Daniel Webster (Whig)
W. P. Mangum (no party affiliation)

1840
William H. Harrison (Whig)
Martin Van Buren (Democratic)

 

Please exercise your right as a citizen of the United States of America and vote in the 57th presidential election.

 

Copyright © 2016 Michèle Simmons Lewis

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

DNA update

My most frustrating brick wall of all time has been trying to find parents for my 4th great-grandfather, James Simmons, born 14 August 1764. I have been working on this for 25 years. The good news is that DNA testing has created a small crack in that brick wall.  You can read up on where I am on with the DNA testing HERE but I have a bit of an update. There were three prominent Simmons men in adjoining counties to where my James lived — Ralph, Willis and Richard Simmons. These three men headed distinct family groups but I have always suspected that the three lines must tie in somewhere. I have actually mentioned Ralph and Willis before HERE.

Ralph served in the same Mississippi Militia unit at the same with my James’ oldest known son William. They were both officers. Coincidence? I was able to find a female descendant of Ralph’s through FamilySearch. She is a genealogist and she was able to find a direct line male descendant of Ralph’s for me to yDNA test. I wrote him a letter and he called me back yesterday. He is more than willing to take the DNA test. We spoke on the phone for about 30 minutes and he was very interested in the case. We should know something in about 6 weeks.

Another genealogist I happened across while working an atDNA angle was able to point me to some specific yDNA already on the Simmons project page. There is a man that has DNA tested who put his brick wall ancestor as John Simmons born 1725. According to this other researcher, This John was Willis Simmons’ grandfather. There is a book written about Willis that you can see
HERE. Willis headed up the “Silver Creek Simmons Family”. On page 23 is this statement, “Willis Simmons was born in Wilkes County, Georgia in 1784, came to Mississippi from Jones County, Georgia sometime between October 11, 1809 and November 1, 1810…” all of this is unverified BUT take a look at THIS PAGE again. Scroll to the graphic at the bottom and then look at the DNA match on the right. Look at the very top person, William Simmons. Look what county he is in. JONES COUNTY. Hmmmmmm. I do have Willis’ passport from Jones County, Georgia to the Mississippi Territory 11 Oct 1809 so that part is correct.1

The person that yDNA tested who is in the Willis Simmons line only tested at 12 markers but it is a 12/12 marker match to my James. I have emailed him asking if he would be willing to upgrade to 67 markers and also does he have a tree I can look at. Willis is looking good as a match and I am thinking we will be able to hook him into the known Jones County line.

There is one other prominent group of Simmons’ in this area at this same time. There happens to be a book written about this family too and you can see it
HERE. This is the “Bala Chitto Simmons Family” headed by Richard Simmons. Richard looks like a good candidate because he was born in South Carolina 04 July 1770 (not verified). Richard headed a huge family over in Pike County, Mississippi, and again, I suspected that the Pike County Simmons’ would tie in. The same person that alerted me to the person that DNA tested in Willis’ line pointed me back to the Simmons yDNA project page.  There was something there that I had completely overlooked. Two direct line descendants of Richard have tested at 111 markers.  I never saw this. Why? Their DNA is completely different. I stopped comparing their DNA to my James at 12 markers because they already had a genetic distance of more than 10. Ouch. Since Richard is a contemporary and was in South Carolina at the same time as my James, there could be an NPE to explain this. As a matter of fact, one tester carries the Simmons surname but the other does not. The two testers are a perfect match to each other. So where does that leave me?  It means that I still have to try and follow Richard’s line on paper because this could still be a match (of a sort) and could lead me back to my James’ parents.


Copyright © 2016 Michèle Simmons Lewis


1 Georgia Department of Archives and History, Passports Issued by Governors of Georgia, 1785-1809  (Arlington, VA: National Genealogical Society, 1959),  28.